Report of General Joseph Knipe At Waynesboro, Encamped at Washington Township

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Union General Joseph Knipe

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE SUSQUEHANNA, Waynesborough, July 11, 1863.

 

The brigadier-general commanding calls the attention of the command to the certainty of an early with the enemy, and it is strictly enjoined upon brigade, regimental, and company commanders to attend at once to the condition of the arms and ammunition of the men under them. No time is to be lost in putting the arms in perfect order, and seeing that the boxes are filled with cartridges. The rations on hand must be cooked and out in haversacks, so that no detention will ensue when the order to march is given, and also that the men may not suffer for food when it may be impossible for the supply trains to reach them. By order of Brig. General W. F. Smith, commanding First Division:

ALEXANDER FARNHAM, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Promulgated by order of Brigadier-General Knipe:

ROBERT MUNCH, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General .

Also the following.

Preparations were immediately made to carry out the above orders. Rations were procured and cooked under the directions of Quartermaster John C. Mullett, and orders were received to form in line at 3 p. m. of the 11th instant. Here, at this time, we joined you brigade for the first time, having been separated, as before mentioned, during our stay at Waynesborough, and marched down the hill on to the road; halted for the other regiments in our brigade to come into line, where we had to wait one full hour before they came into line, a delay, I am happy to say, which the gallant Sixty-eight regiment never caused any officer or brigade while in the service, being always prompt . Preparations being completed, orders were given,

“Battalion, right face; forward march!” and we were off for “Dixie, ” our march being on the direct road to Hagerstown from Waynesborough . Outmarch was with quick step for the first 4 miles. When we arrived at the Little Antietam – a river, from the heavy rains which had fallen, had become much swollen, and was very rough and rapid, the bridge over which had been destroyed by Lee’s army, on their retreat after the Gettysburg fight, only three days before, which we had to ford -we had now advanced some 2 miles across the line into Maryland, After fording and getting everything across, our march was slow and cautious, being in close proximity with the rebel pickets, and every moment expecting an engagement . Marching slowly, the night very dark, mud deep, we came to a halt in an open field about 10 o’clock, where the division bivouacked for the remainder of the night having sent out pickets and taken every precaution against a surprise . Before arriving where we bivouacked, my sickness became so severe that I was obliged to turn over my command to Lieutenant-Colonel Swift, and stopped, accompanied by Surgeon-

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Report of Colonel John B. McIntosh’s Operations Around Waynesboro

OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 1 (Gettysburg Campaign) Page 967-968, No. 348. Reports of Colonel John B. McIntosh, Third Pennsylvania Cavalry commanding First Brigade, Second Division.

HDQ US. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., CAVALRY CORPS,

Near Warrenton, VA., August 20, 1863.

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Colonel John McIntosh, shown later in the war as a general.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders received I have the honor to submit the following report of the movements of the First Brigade of this division since the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863:Late in the afternoon of July 4, I received orders from the division general to report with my brigade to Major-General Pleasonton for orders. In accordance with his orders, I placed my brigade on the extreme left of the army, to picket the different roads and to observe the movements of the enemy in that direction. July 5, I received orders from Major-General Pleasonton move my command at once to Emmitsburg, as some of the enemy’s cavalry had gone in that direction, with further instructions that, should the enemy attempt to gain the rear of the army, I must them up to prevent it. In obedience to those orders, I moved my command at once to Emmitsburg, and found that enemy’s cavalry, under General Stuart, had gone through there in the morning, moving toward Frederick, I also ascertained that after proceeding on the road to Frederick as far as Graceham, they turned toward Hagerstown. Hearing during the day that the enemy was on the road leading from Emmitsburg to Waynesborough, I proceeded with my command in that direction, and soon met the enemy’s picket, which I drove in, capturing a dispatch showing the position of both Generals Longstreet’s and Ewell’s corps, which I immediately forwarded to Major-General Meade, and a copy of it to Major-General Pleasonton. I then found that, in order to reach the enemy, it became necessary for me to advance in a deep mountain gorge, where it would be impossible to use either cavalry or artillery to advance force of infantry was in my immediate front, caused me to withdraw my command in front commanding the corps. In answer to my dispatch, I received orders to move my brigade in front of Emmitsburg, and feel the enemy on the different roads to Fairfield, Jake’s Mountain, and Hagerstown, to ascertain his position, and also to find out if he was on the retreat. I proceeded to carry out these instructions, and had been engaged with the enemy about an hour when I received orders from Major-General Pleasonton to move my command to the Sixth Corps, in front of Fairfield, and report to General Neill for service in following up the enemy from that point, which I promptly complied with.

On the morning of the 7th, I moved with my brigade, in advance of General Neill’s column, by the mountain road toward Waynesborough, picking up a number of the enemy’s stragglers. I reached Waynesborough about 2 p. m. of that day, only two hours behind the rebel army, who, on my approach, burned the brigades over the Antietam. I remained with my brigade near Waynesborough, picketing well out toward the enemy, until the morning of the 10th instant, when I received orders from Major-General Smith, who had assumed command, to move with my brigade through Smithsburg and Cavetown, to ascertain if any enemy was in that locality. Finding none, I retraced my steps toward Leitersburg, and 3 miles to the west of it, and about a mile from Antietam Creek, met the enemy’s cavalry, which I drove across that stream, and which I found strongly guarded with cavalry, infantry, and artillery. Having determined the object upon which I was sent, I withdrew my command to Waynesborough. July 12, I received orders from General Neill, who at this time was detached from General Smith’s command, to move in conjunction with his brigade toward Funkstown. I was here met by an aide from Major-General Pleasonton, with orders to move to Boonsborough and report to General Gregg, which I did the same day. My brigade continued with the division until the 19th, when, in obedience to orders, I moved to Purcellville, in rear of the Twelfth Corps, arriving there July 20, when I was ordered to report to Major-General Pleasonton for orders. My orders were to proceed to Hillsborough, to draw my supplies from Harper’s Ferry, and to scout the country on the opposite side of the Shenandoah toward Charlestown. These orders were obeyed, and valuable information sent to corps headquarters. At 3 a. m. July 23, I received orders to move my command at once to Snickersville, relieve a regiment of the Third Division at Snicker’s Gap, and also a regiment of the same division at Ashby’s Gap. I remained at Snickersville until July 26, when I withdrew from the Gaps, and moved through Upperville and Middleburg to Warrenton, and reported to Major -General Pleasonton on the evening of July 27. On July 28, I again reported to General Gregg at Warrenton Junction.

I am, captain, very respectfully,

J. B. McINTOSH, Colonel, Commanding First Cavalry Brigade.

Cap. H. C. WEIR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Philip S. Crooke in Washington Township, 1863

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Brigadier General Philip S. Crooke

OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 2 (Gettysburg Campaign) page 242-247
HARRISBURG, July 4, 1863.

An order was given to take rations last night. Do troops wasn’t me to tell them to breathe? Always have rations in your haversacks. You want no buggy; you are going in the mountains for a few days. Beef-cattle go forward. Now is the time to aid your country. Let trifles go; march.
D. N. COUCH,

Major-General. On the receipt of this paper -as the only information seemed that we were bound ” for the mountains “- I started on the turnpike leading to the mountains south of Carlisle, all the officers, as well as men, on foot, without anything except they carried it ; not a wagon or pack-horse, or any knowledge of route or supplies,, present or future . The result proved the dispatch in one respect; we wanted “no buggy “- the roads in places were impassable for one. The dispatch was in fault as to the beef-cattle; they did not “go forward” fast enough to overtake us. We were left to our own resources in a country which had been overrun and exhausted by the rebel forces. About 2 miles south of Carlisle, we were overtaken by a heavy rainstorm, and we rested for three hours in a large barn and farm-house. Here we met a few stragglers from the battle of Gettysburg -paroled Union soldiers and rebel deserters – and from them heard of the great battle which was going on when they left. We then knew our route, and started anxiously. We met 3 of the “Brooklyn Fourteenth” who had been taken prisoners and paroled in the battle. Their unexpected recounted with their Brooklyn friends in the middle of Pennsylvania was startling and strange. We left them cheered and cheering. A little before sundown we arrived at Paperville, a village at the gorge of the mountains, with a steam of water which had over- flowed our road. Here we had to ford about half a mile, in places waist -deep; the drummer boys and drums where carried. We halted at Holly Springs after dark; the brigade bivouacked.

Next day a muddy, hard, hungry march to laurel Furnace. July 5. – Came up with General John Ewen’s brigade (Fourth New York State National Guard), who took command. Here the horses of myself and staff reached us. We were marched up a mountain road to a pass looking down upon Gettysburg, about 12 miles off. Bivouacked there; obtained some bread from the inhabitants, who were very kind and considerate. July 6. – Some wagons met us with supplies; obtained one day’s rations; marched on toward the south; bivouacked in the woods next morning.

July 7. – Arrived at Newman’s Gap., on the turnpike from Gettysburg to Chambersburg; met General W. F. Smith, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Susquehanna; saw traces of the battle of Gettysburg in broken caissons, &c.; marched forward on the track of Lee’s army; turned of the turnpike to the south; bivouacked at Funkstown; terrible rain-storm all night and until 10 a. m.

July 8. – But little to eat ; marched on to Waynesborough, near to Maryland line, a considerable village, where we found the Sixth Army of Corps of the Potomac bivouacked on the hills south of the village .

July 9, 10, 11. – Pleasant weather, and rations just before sundown orders to march; marched; forded Antietam Creek, the timber of the brigade, burned by the rebels, yet smoking; 11 p. m. bivouacked at Leitersburg, in a clover-field.

July 12. – Marched to Cavetown; tremendous storm of rain, thunder and daylight; bivouacked there .

July 13. – Marched through Smoketown and Mount Pleasant to Boonsborough, Md. There we met several members of the Fifth Brigade, now in the United States service; Colonel Brewster, of the Excelsior Brigade, Captain E. D. Taft, commanding battery, both of whom distinguished themselves at Gettysburg. Here we were informed that Lee’s army had escaped over the Potomac, and we were ordered home; marched to Frederick, Md. The march was very fatiguing, and Christian Hemming, a private of the Twenty-eight, did form exhaustion.

July 15. – Arrived at Frederick, and bivouacked south of the city remained there until July 17; passed by railroad to Baltimore.

July 18. – Arrived at Philadelphia.

July 19. – Arrived at New York. We were met on the wharf with orders from the Commander-in-Chief to report for duty in Brooklyn, and remained on duty until September 6, in the protection of the peace and property of Kings County, in all of which the whole of my command acquitted themselves as good soldiers and citizens, and did good service. The Seventieth Regiment, remaining at home, were on duty guarding the State arsenal, at Brooklyn, and assisting in preserving the peace during July, until September 6, faithfully and zealously, and also are entitled to the same credit . Their colonel, William J. Cropsey, is an energetic and reliable officer, and the officers and men are of almost respectable class of citizens. It is a valuable corps for home service. The Thirteenth and Twenty-eight Regiments had been in the United States service, in 1861; the Thirteenth also, in 1862. Many hundreds of their members had joined the United States volunteer service, and their uniforms were worn out in the service. Those regiments have done hard and faithful service, and are now reforming, with the prospect of much efficiency. All of which is respectfully submitted.

PHILIP S. CROOKE,

Brigadier-General, Fifth Brigade .

Union General Jesse Smith in Washington Township – 1863

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Jesse Smith, Findagrave website

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, STATE OF NEW YORK. –
No. 413. Report of Brig. General Jesse C. Smith, commanding, Eleventh Brigade, New York State National Guard, of operations June 16-July 19.

HDQRS. 11th Brig., NEW YORK STATE NATIONAL GUARD, Brooklyn, December 28, 1863.

COLONEL: On the morning of the 16th of June last, at about 9 o’clock, I received a telegraphic order from Governor Seymour, dates June 15, ordering all the regiments in my command to be ready to go to Philadelphia at once on short service. On the 18th, the Twenty-thirds Regiment, Colonel William Everdell, jr., 518 strong ; on the 19th the Fifty-sixth Regiment, Lieutenant Colonel J. Q. Adams, 409 strong, and on the 22d, the Fifty-second regiment, Colonel M. W. Cole, with 325 men, left for Harrisburg, Pa. The promptness, with which regiments responded to the call of the Commander-in-Chief was highly commendable.

On the 22nd of June, I received an order from Major-General [Harmanus B.] Duryea, commanding that division, that the Twenty-third, Forty-seventh, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth regiments and such other regiments of the Second Division as should thereafter be designed for that purpose, were constituted a brigade under my command during the term of duty, in obedience to the orders of the Commander-in-Chief. On the afternoon, of the 24th of June, I departed for Harrisburg, Pa., with Major Benjamin Haskell, assistant adjutant-general (chief of staff); Captain John Berry, aide-de-camp; Captain Lebbeus Chapman, jr., brigade quartermaster ; Captain Zachariah Voorhies, assistant commissary of subsistence, on my staff .

On the morning of the 25th of June, I reported to Major-General Couch, at Harrisburg, and afterward, on the same morning crossed the Susquehanna River, and reported to Brigadier-General Hall, then in command of Fort Washington, a newly erected fort of earthworks on the high ground directly opposite Harrisburg. Three of my regiments, the Twenty-third, Fifty-second, and the Fifty-sixth, were then located in and around the fort, having arrived there at different times from the 19th to the 23rd of June. The Forty-seventh Regiment was ordered to Washington, D. C., and did duty in Virginia. On my arrival to take charge of the three regiments of my command, a great state of excitement existed at Harrisburg and through the Cumberland Valley, in consequence of the near approach of General Lee’s army, and of the daily reports that he was marching on Harrisburg, by way of Carlisle, with a large force. The Eight and Seventy-first Regiment New York State National Guard, and one regiment of Pennsylvania militia, having been sent forward, under command of General Knipe, by the Cumberland Vallet Railroad to Shippensburg, and having fallen back from point to point as they were driven in by the rebels, presented the appearance of an advance guard of a large force, delayed the rebels a week or more in their advance, and enabled many other regiments to arrive at Harrisburg, and to throw up to quite formidable earthworks, to erect barricades across the roads through the mountain gaps, and to dig rifle-pits and make other defensive preparations . My hospital surgeon, Major E. Maloe, joined me here, and his services were very valuable at the hospital established near the fort. The entire force was constantly employed night and day, as the regiments arrived, in erecting these earthworks, barricades, &c., and in picket duty, and were saved from an attack from Lee’s army by the delay in its advance, occasioned by the militia force and demonstration, until the morning of the 30th of June. After having driven in our outer line of pickets, the rebels fell back under orders, as appears by General Lee’s report, to meet the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg.

On the 1st of July, the Twenty-second and Thirty-seventh New York State National Guard, with two regiments of Pennsylvania militia, and a battery of citizens artillery from Philadelphia entered Carlisle, 18 miles from Harrisburg, down the Cumberland Valley, and were that night shelled by Stuart’s cavalry, who burned the Carlisle barracks and other buildings. The militia stood their ground nobly, and the artillery is said to have done good service in the defense of the place. On the afternoon of the 1st of July, my three regiments, with the Eight, Eleventh, and Seventy-first Regiments New York State National Guard, and Miller’s light battery, attacked temporarily to the Eight Regiment National Guard, marched out from the fort opposite Harrisburg on the road toward Carlisle, the whole under the command of General Knipe, and went into camp, or rather into a field 7 miles from the fort, at about 9 o’clock in the evening. As we went into quartermaster, heavy cannonading was heard in the direction of Carlisle, and the light of the burning barracks was distinctly visible on the sky. This was as anxious night to our command, as the supposition was that Ewell’s corps of Lee’s army had returned to Carlisle, and attacked our militia there in force, and would capture them, and be down upon us the next morning. We had no intimation that on that day there had been a battle of Gettysburg.

At 2 o; clock the next morning, a staff officer came in from General Couch, with orders to get the baggage train back on the road to Harrisburg, and to have the men in readiness to march at a moment’s notice. At a 3 a. m. another officer came from General Couch, with peremptory orders to march back at once to the fort. Three retreat was then commenced, and continued for about 3 miles. We were then halted in the road, and remained there until near sundown, when we bivouacked on the bank of a beautiful stream for the night, and the next day (July 3) marched to Carlisle, about 15miles. The weather was very warm, the men marched with their knapsacks packed, their blankets rolled, their haversacks supplied with two days ‘ ration, and their cartridge-boxes with 40 rounds. The suffered greatly from this first march, and were compelled to leave their knapsacks and many other things that were afterward much needed.

The next morning (July 4), our column, having been united to the brigades of General Ewen and Crooke, and a bridge of Pennsylvania militia, under command of Colonel Brisbane, with Landis’ battery of artillery from Philadelphia, which was now attached to our division, in command of General Knipe -in all about fifteenth regiments of infantry, one battery, and one light battery of artillery -moved out on the Mount holly road, south from Carlisle, and away from all railroad communication. About 12 o’clock it commenced to rain, and continued through the afternoon and night. The road led through the South Mountain, and was very narrow and muddy. The men marched through mud and water, oftentimes kneedeep. The Twenty-third Regiment, having had some of its men nearly drowned while fording a stream, had to stop for the night. The men of the other regiments struggled and straggled through, but when we halted for the night, at 9 o’clock, scarcely a “corporal’s guard” was present.

The next morning (the 5t of July), without anything to eat, and without waiting for the command to come up, we were marched over the mountains about 5 miles, and encamped; here we gathered some bread and other eatables from the neighborhood.

The next day (the 6th of July) was another rainy day, and night founds us on the road from Gettysburg to Chambersburg, on which the day before the rebels had retreated, without rations, the men sleeping on the west ground in an orchard; General Knipe and myself and our staffs without anything to eat excepting a little prepared coffee and a peace of bread. Captain Cipperly, additional aide-de-camp, at this time reported to me for duty.

The following night, the men having encamped in a piece of wood, found themselves immersed in water in the morning. Our supplies, which were to have come forward, had gone by mistake to Gettysburg. My quartermaster was directed to gather up all loose horses and wagons, and was then sent to Shippensburg from supplies. These did not reach us until after we had arrived at Waynesborough, on the 10th of July. We here (Waynesborough) connected with the Army of the Potomac, and had two or three days of rest. From this place, on the 12th and 13th, we marched to within 1 or 2 miles of Boonsborough, Md. Here w encamped again in the rain, and with scant rations. The next day we advanced on the National road toward Hagerstown, about 2 miles, and as we marched we heard the firing on the Potomac, as Kilpatrick engaged the rebels while crossing. A general engagement was expected, and our force stood in line of battle on the field where Kilpatrick had fought on the Friday proceeding, in readiness, if called upon as a reserve force to the Army of the Potomac, then in front of us.

In the afternoon, we were informed that General Lee had recrossed the Potomac River with his whole army. The next morning we were dismissed by General W. F. Smith, and my command, including the Eight and Seventy-first Regiments with Generals Ewen’s and Crooke’s, were placed in command of General Ewen, and directed to march to Frederick, where we would embark for home.

The march to Frederick, on the 15 of the July, was 18 miles over the South Mountain, and without rations. The men, supposing that Frederick was the termination of their day’s march, came in to that town in good order ; but when, after dark, the command was ordered by the commanding officer to march to the railroad junction, 3 or 4 miles farther, they became disheartened, and, having no rations served them since the day before, they suffered much from hunger and fatigue, and as they went into camp at 9 o’clock at night, one man of the Twenty-eight Regiment actually died from exhaustion – an unnecessary hardship, because the troops were on the homeward march, and did not obtain transportation for the next twenty-four hours . The following night the troops were embarked, in a most severe rain-storm, on board of cars for Baltimore, Md., some of the men in open cars, exposed to the storm. The entire next day was spent in reaching Baltimore, and the whole of the night of the 17th and of the of the 18th were spent in getting to Harrisburg, and many of the men in open cars, exposed to the rain an night air.

On Sunday, the 19th of July we came from, Harrisburg, and arrived in New York in the afternoon. The command in fifteen days were marched over 100 miles, most of the time in the rain, without proper clothing or shoes for many of the men, with scarcely half the ordinary rations of soldiers, and those irregularly supplied . With little or no covering at night, not even blankets or shelter tents, it is not to be wondered at that many have suffered and that others have died from sickness contracted in this short campaign; and when the facts shall be fully collected and properly detailed, I am sure that the General Government will be satisfied that if ” little or no reliance can be placed upon the paid militia ” (General Halleck’s report), it has at least contributed something toward the safety of the capital of the State of Pennsylvania, and of the great railroads that cross the Susquehanna River at or near that place.

The Sixty-eight Regiment New York State National Guard, from Chautauqua County, were with us at the front, and did yeomen’s service with axes in leveling a forest around, and marched with us the entire route. There was also another column, consisting of Pennsylvania Militia, under the command of General Dana, that went down the Cumberland Valley Railroad after it was reconstructed in part, and joined the Army of the Potomac near Hagerstown. The officers under my command having been required to make a report of their several regiments directly to the Commander-in-Chief, have, as I am informed, made such report.

The Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth having furnished to me copies, which have been printed, I annex. The Twenty-third and Forty-seventh Regiments have not made to me any reports. Too much praise cannot be given to the officers and men of the several regiments of my brigade for the promptness with which they responded to the call of the Commander-in-Chief, and for their endurance of fatigue in their duty, of throwing up embankments, felling forests, and marching through such and extent of country, so poorly as they were supplied with clothing, with camp equipments, and with rations. By the activity and energy of the different members of my staff, the several regiments in our column of march were much assisted, and their wants and suffering greatly alleviated.

Respectfully, yours,

JESSE C. SMITH,

More of Union General William Smith In Washington Township

WFSmith_MGENOFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 2 (Gettysburg Campaign) page 220- 223
No. 407. Report of Brig. General William F. Smith, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations June 26-July 15.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPT. OF SUSQUEHANNA, Greencastle, Pa., July 18, 1863.
Major: I have to report that, in obedience to orders from the general commanding, I assumed command of the troops south of the Susquehanna and in the vicinity of Harrisburg on Friday, June 26, and was busily engaged until Tuesday, 30th, in strengthening the defenses at Bridgeport, opposite the city of Harrisburg, and at Marysville, to protect the bridges of the Pennsylvania and Northern Central Railroads. On Sunday, a rebel cavalry force, with a section of artillery, came to our picket line near Oyster Point, and drove in our cavalry pickets, but did not succeed in moving the infantry pickets .

On Monday, I sent the regular cavalry, under Lieutenant [Frank] Stanwood, on the Carlisle road, and he engaged and drove in the pickets of the enemy, but was obliged to retire under a fire of artillery which was opened on him. On Tuesday, learning that the rebel infantry had left Carlisle, the cavalry was ordered forward, and found the enemy at Sporting Hill. General Ewen, New York militia, in command of the Twenty-second and Thirty-seventh New York State Militia, went forward to support Lieutenant Stanwood, and a section of Landis’ battery, under the direction of Lieutenant Muhlenberg, was immediately ordered up. The enemy was found in position, and attacked about 4 p. m.

The artillery arrived on the ground about 5 p. m., and soon silenced the fire on the enemy. General Ewen’s command was ordered forward to occupy Carlisle, but did not march until the next morning . Captain Boyd, First New York Cavalry, with 120 men, was also ordered by the Trindle Spring Road, via Churchtown, to Carlisle. He stopped at Chuchstown, and entered Carlisle on the morning of July 1.

Colonel Brisbane, commanding the Pennsylvania Brigade, was ordered to move on Carlisle by the mud road at daylight, but owing to a want of transportation, did not to move until about 9 a. m. I visited the headquarters to receive instructions and make arrangements for supplies and transportation, and, recrossing the river, the remainder of the command, under Brigadier-general Knipe, U. S. Volunteers, was directed to march as far as practicable and encamp, and to move at an early hour in the morning.

The Eleventh New York Artillery, under Colonel Forbes, refused to march under certain pleas, and the, matter was referred to General Couch. This delayed my starting till 3. 30 p. m., and finally, leaving orders with General Knipe to carry out the instructions with reference to the refractory regiment, I left to join the advance. Hearing rumors on the road of a large cavalry force in the vicinity, I sent out scouts on the cross-road, and ousted on, entering Carlisle at sunset.

General Ewen had passed through the town on the Baltimore turnpike about 1 and 1/2 miles, and, while going on to examine his position, word came from my scouts that a large cavalry force of the enemy was in the immediate vicinity, on the York road, and, turning back, before I entered the village, their guns had opened on us. The road for several miles back of us was filled with stragglers from the brigades of General Ewen and Colonel Brisbane, and the men with me were wearied with a long march to which they were unused. Under these circumstances, I determined to content myself till morning with simply holding the town, but before I could get a line of skirmishers out, a summons was sent by General Fitzhugh Lee to surrender the town, or send out the women and children . I sent an answer that the women and children would be notified to leave. In less than half an hour, another message was sent to the purport that, if not surrendered, the town would be burned. The answer was returned that one answer had already been given. Then sent a volunteer aide, Mr. Ward, of Harrisburg, to communicate with General Knipe, and order him to march at 3 a. m., and to report to General Couch the position of affairs. In the meantime the enemy opened a battery on the town, to which, by my orders, our artillery did not reply, as I demand the fire too inaccurate, and wished to save my ammunition.

About 11 o’clock I sent another volunteer aide-de-camp, Mr. James Dougherty, to try and get to General Knipe with orders to move immediately. Mr. Dougherty was captured and his orderly wounded and about 12 m. a third and last summons came to surrender, to which the reply was given that the message had been twice answered before. About i o’clock the firing ceased, with the exception of three guns about 3 a. m., soon after which reports came in that the enemy was moving off on a country road which came into the turnpike about 2 and 1/2 miles from Carlisle, and by daylight there was nothing opposed to us . The casualties were 12 wounded, none fatally.

Thursday [July 2] the entire command was put in near the barracks, which had been burned during the night, and on Friday a train of provisions came up to Carlisle . The supplies which we could draw from the citizens were extremely limited, though every disposition to aid us was manifested. General Knipe’s command having joined me on Friday [July3], the whole command was put in a motion at 6 a. m. on Saturday [July4] for Mount Holly, where we were detained for two hours by the arrival of about 2, 000 prisoners, paroled on the battle-field, and sent under a flag of truce toward Carlisle .

Wishing to prevent the enemy from getting information of our strength, I was forced to accept the prisoners, subject to the decision of the Government, and turn the rebel escort back. The Thirty-seventh New York Militia Regiment was left at Mount Holly to watch the Baltimore road, and the command moved toward Pine Grove. A most furious rain-storm set in, which raised the creeks, carried away bridges, and made the march toilsome in the extreme.

The command of General Ewen was left at Laurel Forge, to cover the entrance to the narrow valley, and also watch a road leading over the mountain to Bendersville. The remainder of the force was concentrated at Pine Grove Furnace, the Eight New York State Militia being ordered to hold the pass to Bendersville from Pine Grove. On Sunday, General Knipe was ordered with his command to hold the cross-roads from Mount Holly to Cashtown and Pine Grove to Bendersville, while General Ewen crossed the mountain to the Mount Holly and Cashtown road, holding the pass in his rear, and being within a mile of Genera; Knipe’s command. Colonel Brisbane, with the Pennsylvania Brigade, was holding a by-road from Pine Grove to Cashtown.

A cavalry scout, under Lieutenant Stanwood, was sent up Mountain Creek Valley, in the direction of the pass from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, through which it was supposed the enemy would send his trains, if he were defeated. Lieutenant Stanwood drove in the pickets a couple of miles from the turnpike, but had not sufficient force to press on. Captain Boyd joined me at Pen Grove, having followed the rear guard of the enemy to Fayetteville, on the Gettysburg and Chambersburg road, capturing prisoners. He was directed to pass by Bendersville, in the direction of Cashtown, to try and ascertain the movements and position of the enemy. He fell in with them, and captured eight wagons and -prisoners. During the day a small provision train came up, which was very acceptable, as it was impossible to subsist the troops from the country. A scout from General Meade also came through, giving the information the enemy was retiring; and latter in the day, Captain West, a volunteer aide and assistant on the Coast Survey, returned having successfully opened communications with General Meade on Saturday from Mount Holly.

On Monday morning I marched the brigade by three different roads, concentrating at Newman’s Pass behind Cashtown. We were, however too late intercept the trains which had gone that route. Tuesday morning, I was proposing to enter the Cumberland Valley and follow down the mountains toward Boonsborough, when an order came from General Meade to march to Gettysburg, which order was shortly after countermanded, with permission to do as I had proposed.

The command was then marched to Altodale, and an officer sent to Chambersburg, to try and procure supplies, as my trains had failed to overtake me. A small supply being procured, the troops were marched on Wednesday to Waynesborough where I found General Neill, with a brigade of infantry and one of cavalry, and eight pieces of artillery.

Here I was forced to wait for my trains to come up, but sent a cavalry scout to communicate with General Meade, west of South Mountain. Thursday was spent in waiting for rations to come up, and for instructions from General Meade. On Friday, I was ordered by him to occupy the enemy to the best advantage, and at be ready to join the Army of the Potomac or General Couch, as circumstances might require.

Colonel McIntosh was at once ordered with his brigade of cavalry and four guns to feel the enemy along the Antietam below Leitesburg, which he did in the most skillful manner, driving his cavalry pickets across the creek upon their infantry and artillery supports. The cavalry was supported in this movement by tow regiments of Pennsylvania militia, under Colonel Frick, at Ringgold and Smithsburg, and one regiment, Forty-third New York Volunteers, from General Neill’s command, posted near Leitesburg.

On Saturday, hearing that rebels had ordered a miller on Marsh Run to grind wheat all night for them, Colonel Brisbane, with two regiments of Pennsylvania militia, was ordered, if possible, to intercept the wagons going for the flour, and destroy the grain if he could not bring it off. These regiments were supported by the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, of General Neill’s command. From 2 prisoners captured at the mill, we learned that the enemy had fallen back to Hagerstown.

Colonel Brisbane’s command was left at Waynesborough, with orders to march at daylight, and the rest of the troops were moved to Leitersburg, excepting the command of Colonel Frick, which was ordered from Ringgold to Chewsville. During the night an order came for General Neill to join the Army of the Potomac at once, and, as no instruction were sent to me, I ordered Colonel Brisbane to remain at Waynesborough, to guard my communications, and moved with what force I had with me to Cavetown.

After positing my troops there, I reported in person to General Meade, and recommended to him to divide my command among the old division of the Army of the Potomac before the anticipated battle. Under the supposition that this was to be done, I ordered Colonel Brisbane to Hagerstown, and moved with the rest of the command to the Boonsborough turnpike near Beaver Creek. General Meade declined to distribute the militia, and I remained until Wednesday morning, when I received orders to send the New York State militia home, via Frederick, and these necessary orders were given. The Pennsylvania militia were concentrated at Hagerstown, under Colonel Brisbane, who was appointed military governor, with instructions to watch the ford at Williamsport and Falling Waters.

Before closing, I must call to the remembrance of the general commanding the force that I moved without a quartermaster or commissary, without supply trains, some regiments even being without haversacks, and with no adequate transportation of the cooking utensils of the men, and must pay the proper tribute to the general behavior of the troops during long marches, in rainy weather and without sufficient food.

The rugged mountain roads left many of them barefooted, but the greater portion of the command seemed animated by a desire to do all that was required in the service of their country. Colonel Brisbane deserves special mention for the manner in which he managed and led his command, and I earnestly recommend him to notice. Captain Boyd, First New York Cavalry, also did gallant service with his small force. I am much indebted to Captain M. A. Reno, U. S. Cavalry, who acted as my chief of staff; to Lieutenant Muhlenberg, my chief of artillery; to Lieut, Rufus King, Fourth U. S. Artillery, and to Lieutenant Johnson, U. S. Cavalry, for their services. To my own aides-Lieutenants [Matthew] Berry and [Campbell] Tucker, and the following gentlemen, who were volunteer aides:Colonel McCormick, Captains P. C. F. West and Lamborn, Lieuts. Samuel Carey, F. Rogers, and – Evans, and Mr. Ward –

I am indebted for zealous and defatigable service. Dr. John Neill, medical director of the division, was particularly watchful and efficient in the discharge of his duties.

Very respectfully,

Wm. F. SMITH,
Brigadier-General .

Union General William Smith in Washington Township

WFSmith_MGENOFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 2 (Gettysburg Campaign) Page 225-226
No. 407. Report of Brig. General William F. Smith, U. S. Army, commanding First Division (New York Militia)

Sunday, July 5. – The troops were moved from Pine Grove at 8 a. m. over the mountain, on the Bendersville road, General Knipe’s brigade, with one section of artillery, being placed at the intersection of this road with the road from Holly Springs to Shippensburg, and Colonel Brisbane’s brigade on a wood road leading into the Shippensburg road. Ewen’s brigade moved from Laurel Forge in the morning, by a road across the mountain, to a point where the road from Holly Springs to Shippensburg is crossed by the road from Laurel Forge to Bendersville. The Thirty-seventh New York was ordered to move to the fork of the road, 2 miles below Mount Holly, where the Gettysburg road comes into the Pine Grove road. Owing to the movements of the enemy, this regiment was afterward withdrawn, and rejoined the main body.

Monday, July 6. – All the troops moved by different roads to Newmans’ Cut, on the turnpike between Gettysburg and Chambersburg, 4 miles east of Cashtown, where they were concentrated during the evening .

Tuesday, July 7. – Orders were received from General Meade to move the command to Gettysburg, but just as the troops were about starting, the order was changed, and the head of the column left Newman’s Cut at 11 a. m. for Alto Furnace, where the whole force arrived, from 5 to 7 o’clock. Lieutenant Stanwood, with 100 cavalry, crossed to the same point by the way of Caledonia Springs. A scout sent out reported at 8. 30 p.m. that the Twelfth Corps occupied Waynesborough.

Wednesday, July 8. – Moved from Aldodale at 11 a. m.; reached Waynesborough in the afternoon. Two regiments, under Colonel Frick, arrived after dark. The whole force was encamped in line of battle on the right (Colonel Bisbane) and left (New York troops) of the road to Hagerstown, a mile and a half out of Waynesborough. The force at Waynesborough was found to be not the Twelfth Corps, but a small force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, under General Milroy.

Thursday, July 9. – Was sent in Waynesborough. Two regiments of Colonel Frick’s were sent to Ringgold, in Maryland.

Friday, July 10. – A reconnaissance by General Neill’s cavalry found the enemy in force on the right bank of the Antietam, below Leiterburg. An examination of the country from Franklin Cliff, Md., informed us that a large force of the enemy was encamped on high ground, 2 and 1/2 miles from Hagerstown, on the Waynesborough road, and a smaller force on the Boonsborough road, near Hagerstown. No earthworks could be discovered, nor any earthworks on the ridge toward Williamsport. No movements were visible on the Williamsport road. The supply train arrived in the evening. The short marches and the delay at Waynesborough were caused by the want of provisions and the impossibility of bringing up the supply trains with sufficient celerity. Every effort was made to supply the command with rations from the country people, but with little success, the rebels having cleaned out the region. Orders had been issued to the command to be in readiness to move, but a dispatch was received on the evening of the 10th, from General Meade, ordering that the commands of General Milroy and General Smith should remain at Waynesborough, to occupy the enemy or to join General Meade or General Couch, as the movements of the enemy might permit to require. According to this dispatch, General Meade’s right wing was to be on the Boonsborough and Hagerstown turnpike, between Antietam and Beaver Creek, and his left at Bakersville, on the evening of the 10th.

Saturday, July 11. – Colonel Brisbane with the Gray reserves and Twenty-eight Pennsylvania, supported by the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, of General Neill’s command, made a reconnaissance to Marsh Mill, within the enemy’s lines of the day before, about 4, miles from camp. He destroyed 24 barrels of flour which had been ground for the rebels, and all the grain (100 bushels) in the mill. The patrol returned about dark. The whole command, excepting these troops engaged under Colonel Brisbane, moved at dusk to Leitersburg, and encamped there for the night.

Sunday, July 12. -The command (excepting Colonel Brisbane’s) left Leitersburg at 6 a. m., and reached Cavetown at noon. Colonel Brisbane moved from Waynesborough. Colonel Frick moved to Chewsville.

Monday, 13th. – The force at Cavetown, under the temporary command of General Knipe for the march, moved to a point near Smoketown. The orders were to go to Benevola, where Beaver Creek crosses the Boonsborough and Hagerstown turnpike, but they were not understood. The Blue Reserves took part in a skirmish under General Kilpatrick, near Hagerstown, with a loss of 1 killed and 9.

F. Jesse Beard of Company C, Cole’s Cavalry

flohrjessebeard

Flor Jesse Beard was born on November 12, 1835 at Fountaindale, PA. Upon the returning home he enlisted in Cole’s Cavalry, Company C (1st Potomac Home Brigade, Maryland) on November 4, 1862 as corporal. F. Jesse Beard mustered out of service on June 28, 1865. He died on October 14, 1901

F. Jesse Beard’s Fall from an Apple Tree Proves Fatal

 

The Accident Happened Ten days Ago and was a prominent citizen. Served as a School Director And Town Councilman. Foreman of the Wood Department at Geiser Company for 28 years.

F. Jesse Beard, one of Waynesboro’s most prominent citizen, died Tuesday evening at a quarter before five o’clock at his residence, 56 East Main street, aged 65 years, 11 months and 8 days. Though not unexpected, his death came as a shock to this community where he was known well and so favorably known, and wide spread sorrow is felt today for the loss of a good man.

The primary cause of Mr. Beard’s death reunited from a fall from an apple tree near town, ten days ago, producing a violent shock to his nervous system in addition to a number of bruises about the body and head, and possibly causing a fracture at the base of the droll.

Three days later the rupture of an artery of the brain occurred, and later; cerebral trouble developed. Last Thursday evening he had a slight stroke of paralysis, affecting the right side of his, face, tongue and throat; later heart trouble ensued, the complication baffling the skill of the attending physicians. About 10 o’clock Tuesday morning he became unconscious, in which condition he remained until dissolution took place at the hour stated, when, in the presence of his devoted children, he peacefully passed away.

Mr. Beard was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth Beard and was born on his father’s farm at Fountaindale, Adams County, where he grew to manhood. While yet a young man, he went to Springfield, Illinois, when he learned the trade of millwright. Returning home later, he enlisted in the army in 1862 and served three years in Captain Cole’s cavalry company of Frederick, Md., participating in a number of battles and skirmishes until the close of the Civil War.

In 1866 he married Miss Mary E. Buhrman of Fountaindale, who died nine years ago, by whom he had ten children, of whom six survive. In 1872 Mr. Beard removed to Waynesboro where he has since resided, taking an active and prominent in all her affairs, both, industrial and educational.

He was especially prominent in the affairs of the Geiser Mfg. Co., almost from it’s beginning, and in whose; growth and development he was not only much interested, but in which he had a large share, being for some time a member of the Board of Directors and for years a stockholder.

For twenty-eight years, he was employed in the wood department of the Geiser Company being a foreman for a number of years, until two years ago when he retired from active life. As said, Mr. Beard was much interested in the cause of education and general affairs of the town, serving several terms of as school director and a member of the town council, in both of these spheres of activity, he exerted a wide influence by reason of his intelligence and sound judgment.

At the time of his death, he was president of the Burns Hill Cemetery association, with which he had been closely identified for some years. He was a lifelong member of the Methodist church and at his death was a trustee and treasurer an evidence of his prominence in the congregation. He was also a past commander of the Captain Walker Post, G.A.R. His death removes one our best and most useful citizens, and his children suffer the loss of a kind and indulgent father.

Charles Capehart Received the Medal of Honor For Bravery At The Battle of Monterey Pass

17203254_736687009828265_5582279057359834548_nCharles Capehart was born in 1833 at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he served out west with Generals John Fremont and U.S. Grant. His service record there is a bit sketchy, but appears he enlisted for the short term.

On June 30, 1862, he received a commission as Captain of Company A, 1st Virginia Cavalry, where he fought in several engagements in Virginia.  Captain Capehart’s reputation for bravery would be earned in the eastern theater of the war.

A year later, on June 6, 1863, Captain Capehart was promoted to Major of the 1st Virginia Cavalry. It would be the Pennsylvania Campaign or as many call it, the Gettysburg Campaign in which he would earn his reputation for bravery and courage under fire. Shortly after his promotion to Major, West Virginia was admitted into the Union as the 35th State on June 20, 1863.

During the Battle of Monterey Pass, Major Capehart commanded the 1st West Virginia Cavalry, while their commander, Colonel Nathaniel Richmond commanded the brigade. 24 year old Major Capehart, just after 3:30 a.m. on July 5 turned to his men and ordered a charge. The regiment charged the Confederate artillery piece, and then turned their attention to the wagon trains in front of them. Taking prisoners and destroying wagons as the charged down South Mountain.

By March of 1864, Major Capehart was recommended for promotion. His brother would take over command of a cavalry brigade leaving Lt. Col. Darr to command the regiment. On August 4, at Front Royal, VA,  Major Capehart mustered out of the 1st West Virginia Cavalry by reason of promotion. The next day,  Capehart received his commission of Lieutenant Colonel, officially replacing Lt. Colonel Joseph Darr who just resigned from the 1st West Virginia Cavalry.

For the remainder of the war, Lt. Col. Capehart commanded the 1st West Virginia Cavalry Regiment. They fought hard in the Shenandoah Valley and played a role during the Appomattox Campaign until the Army of Northern Virginia surrendered on April 9, 1865. Lt. Colonel Capehart and his 1st West Virginia Cavalry mustered out of military service on July 8, 1865 at Wheeling, WVA.

The Battle of Monterey Pass lived on with many of the West Virginians as they often wrote about their experiences for the newspapers. On April 7, 1898, Charles Capehart received a Medal of Honor for his actions and bravery that he displayed during the Battle of Monterey Pass. Charles Capehart died in 1911 in Washington D.C. and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Citation:
“For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Major Charles E. Capehart, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 4 July 1863, while serving with 1st West Virginia Cavalry, in action at Monterey Mountain, Pennsylvania. While commanding the regiment, Major Capehart charged down the mountain side at midnight, in a heavy rain, upon the enemy’s fleeing wagon train. Many wagons were captured and destroyed and many prisoners taken.”
Date of Issue: April 7, 1898
Action Date: July 4, 1863

Lt. Henry G. Bonebrake

Moyer, Henry P. History of the Seventeenth regiment, Pa. volunteer cavalry or one hundred and sixty-second in line of Pa. volunteer regiments, war to supline the rebellion, 1861-1865; by Pennsylvania cavalry. 17th regt., 1862-1865; 1911, pg. 155-156

histseventee00editrich_0184Lieutenant Henry G. Bonebrake was born near Waynesboro, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1838. His early life was spent on the farm with his father in the vicinity of Waynesboro, Pa. On September 8, 1862, he went to the office of Michael H. Stoner, a justice of the peace in Waynesboro, and signed the muster roll of the Waynesboro Cavalry, then being recruited in Franklin county, and later became one of the chief promoters of the company. When the company was permanently organized he was elected first sergeant of the company and served in that capacity until December 15, 1864, when he was commissioned second lieutenant.

On January 14, 1865, he was commissioned first lieutenant of the company. From the day the company was mustered into the United States service, September 26, 1862, until the day of his muster out of the service, June 21, 1865, he had a continuous service record with the company.

On October, 1863, during the engagement at Stephensburg, Virginia, his horse was shot on the skirmish line. He, with Comrade Aaron Harman who was also dismounted at the time, was cut off from the company and experienced great difficulty in crossing a swollen stream in their rear.

While emerging from the stream on the opposite side, they were greeted with a volley of Rebel bullets and he received a slight wound. On December 23, 1864, in the mounted charge near Gordonsville, Virginia, his horse was again shot from under him, receiving two bullet wounds, and was killed.

On April 1, 1865, at the battle of Five Forks, Virginia, while charging the enemy’s breastworks, Lieutenant Bonebrake and Comrade William Cummings were the first to leap over the breastworks. Seeing a Rebel battery flag, he made a dash for it, but failed in the attempt to capture it. A short distance to the right was another Confederate color-bearer who was enthusiastically waving his flag and urging his comrades to stand by the colors. While the color bearer s attention was principally directed to the assault in his immediate front, Lieutenant Bonebrake rushed to his side, grasped his colors and demanded his surrender. A hand to hand struggle followed and he succeeded in capturing the flag.

histseventee00editrich_0187For this distinguished and meritorious act he was one of fifty-one who, having captured Confederate flags, presented in person their trophies to the Secretary of War, the Honorable Edwin M. Stanton, receiving his warm personal congratulations. All who presented Confederate flags on that occasion were granted a thirty days furlough. In further recognition of his distinguished bravery, he received from the War Department, May 5, 1865, a medal of honor for conspicuous bravery in the battle of Five Forks, Virginia, April 1, 1865, together with the following letter:

WAR DEPARTMENT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL S OFFICE,

WASHINGTON, D. C, MAY 3, 1865.

Lieutenant H. G. Bonebrake, Company G, Seventeenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry.

Sir : Herewith I enclose the medal of honor which has been awarded you under the resolution of Congress, approved July 12, 1862 : To provide for the presentation of medals of honor to the enlisted men of the army and volunteer forces who have distinguished or may distinguish themselves in battle during the present rebellion. Please acknowledge the receipt.

Very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant General.

An act of Congress approved April 23, 1904, provided for the issue of a medal. The first was of bronze, the latter of silver heavily electrotyped in gold. It is much handsomer than the old medal. The new medal was received by Lieutenant Bonebrake on Memorial Day, May 30, 1905. Lieutenant Bonebrake prizes these medals very highly and regards them as rare souvenirs to hand down to his posterity. Lieutenant Bonebrake was regularly mustered out of the United States service, with his company, at Clouds Mills, Virginia, in obedience to General Order No. 312, War Department, June 16, 1865.

First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization 1774 to November, 1874, printed For The Thoop, By Hallowell & Co, Philadelphia, PA, 1874, Pg 71-74.

On the morning of the twentieth, requisition for ammunition, tents, &c., was made upon the State Government, and promptly complied with, and orders were received to proceed by rail to Gettysburg. After a delay of four hours, transportation was furnished, and in half an hour afterwards the horses, wagons, equipments and men were in the cars. Much to the regret of the Company, Sergeant Maher was compelled by sickness to return to Philadelphia.

The Troop reached Gettysburg at 4 o’clock the next morning, and immediately disembarked, in the midst of a violent rain storm, and after coffee had been prepared and enjoyed by the men, the Command was mounted and marched into the town, when without much ceremony it quartered itself at the McClellan House; the horses in the stables and the men in the hay loft over them. The Company reported to Major Granville O. Haller, of the Seventh United States Infantry, who was in command of this post at the time. He at once ordered a detail of ten men to reconnoitre in the direction of Chambersburg. This party, under command of Cornet Randall, fell in with some of the enemy and captured three of their number. In the chase preceding the capture, private White’s horse becoming unruly dashed him against a tree and broke his leg.

This reconnoissance established the presence of a large body of the enemy between Williamsport and Chambersburg, and was therefore most valuable in its results. In the afternoon of the same day a rumor reached Gettysburg that a large body of the enemy were advancing from the direction of Fairfield, which lies a few miles south-west of Gettysburg. The remainder of the Troop, under First Sergeant Rogers, was ordered out to reconnoitre.

The detachment was accompanied by Captain Robert Bell and a squad of local cavalry from the Company under his command, as well as by Major Haller. About one mile east of Fairfield the party came up to a body of about one hundred and sixty of the enemy’s mounted infantry, who were scouring the country for forage and plunder of every kind, particularly for horses, of which they were much in need. The main body of the enemy was stationed at a barn in the outskirts of the town, while detachments were out in various directions. Major Haller being satisfied with what he saw, returned in haste to Gettysburg, leaving the command with Captain Bell, who proved himself a brave, intelligent and conscientious soldier. Captain Bell, after taking necessary precautions to avoid surprise from the rear, advanced with care until within a half mile of the town, the command was then ordered to charge, which it did through the town and for more than a mile beyond, driving the enemy rapidly towards the mountain pass. Night coming on the Column was halted, and after a short stop in Fairfield, where it received many marks of kindness and loyal support, it returned to quarters.

Gettysburg at this period was so much exposed that the Troop wagons were sent to Oxford, in the direction of York, so as to avoid their capture in case of a sudden advance of the enemy. At this time privates Conover and Welsh were detailed as orderlies to Major Haller.

On the afternoon of the twenty-second, a detachment was sent out scouting in the direction of Cashtown, which returned at midnight. During the afternoon of the twenty-third, the Troop accompanied by Major Charles McLean Knox of the 9th New York Cavalry, operating with the army of the Potomac, was ordered to move rapidly toward Cashtown on the Chambersburg Turnpike, in order to intercept a body of the enemy which had been seen moving across that road an hour or two before. The Troop reached Cashtown, a distance of eight miles, after a sharp gallop, and it there ascertained that the enemy was some distance above that point near a tavern called Moonshours, in Newman’s Gap of the South Mountain. Darkness coming on, a picket guard of ten men under Sergeant Brown was stationed at Cashtown while the rest of the Command returned to Gettysburg where it arrived after 9 o’clock. The order to unsaddle had hardly been obeyed when ” boots and saddles” was again sounded, and the men remained up all night, momentarily expecting to see their pickets driven in.

Detachments of the Troop patroled all the roads leading in the direction of the enemy, and those remaining at quarters kept their horses, saddled day and night. The wagons having been sent to the rear as before stated, the men were largely dependent upon the patriotic kindness of the citizens of Gettysburg, who were unremitting in their generous attention, and it was never too late or early for them to have ready a meal for the Troopers on their return from scout or picket duty. Their sympathy and kind offices will ever be gratefully remembered.

The Troop was kept on continuous duty, no member obtaining more than four or five hours sleep in the twenty-four, and this rest frequently broken by orders to “saddle up.” For several nights the only rest obtained by the men was that got while lying in front of their horses, bridle in hand, ready to mount at a moments warning.